Canned Pear Cake

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This time of year the empty jars start piling up, and the full jars start to disappear. The jar management game, if you’re a canner,  begins. I might be a little early this year. I tend to be somewhat of a hoarder, which means that by the time asparagus and rhubarb starting producing in the garden, I’m still using up pantry items. This year I want to have a clean slate by that time. And to defrost the freezer! Big plans over here. This cake was a success on all fronts, even though it’s name sounds dull. Not only was it delicious, but it used up almost two jars of pantry goods. And it’s a healthy breakfast cake to boot. Success!

Success feels good. Of course, I don’t post failures, but don’t be fooled, they are legion. I’m never truly bothered by a kitchen fail. It’s disappointing, sure (especially when I think something is going to turn out great and spectacularly fails), but it never deters me from forging ahead. I’m so matter of fact about the failures: huh, that didn’t work. Guess I’ll try this. I wish I could be that forgiving with the rest of my life. I’ve been thinking about this topic a lot lately after reading this article on Brain Pickings about fixed  and growth mindsets; in particular I liked the quote about how growth mindsets  instill “a passion for learning rather than a hunger for approval.”  People with a fixed mindset, on the other hand, “see risk and effort as potential giveaways of their inadequacies, revealing that they come up short in some way.” My cooking life definitely has a growth mindset. The rest of me? Not so much.  I think my personal life could learn a lot from my cooking life–the biggest lesson being: keep going in the face of failures (big plural!).

The success of this recipe is that it’s adapted one of my favorite recipes from The Laurel’s Kitchen Bread Book, a simple one for banana bread. My spin is that I’ve used some pears canned in light syrup, and a pear jam. I also like date molasses (try it!) for this, but maple syrup or honey would both be fine. Keep in mind the honey will be sweeter, so maybe use 1/4 cup, and maple perhaps 1/2 cup? It also depends on how sweet your jam and pears are, so adjust for that.

Canned Pear Cake

Preheat oven to 350. Grease an 8×8 pan.

2 cups canned pears (this can be pear sauce, or canned pear halves that have been mashed)

3 tablespoons of oil or melted butter

1/3 cup of date molasses (or 1/4 cup of honey; 1/2 cup maple syrup–see note above on sweeteners)

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 tablespoon of lemon juice

2 cups white whole wheat flour

2 teaspoons of baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup pear jam (mine was a chunky style with no embellishments)

1 tablespoon of sugar for topping (optional)

Mix the first five ingredients well. Whisk the dry ingredients in a separate bowl. Mix them together. Smooth in prepared pan. Spread the top with jam, and sprinkle with sugar for a little crispness, and bake for about 40 minutes. Look for the sides to be golden, and the very tips of the jam beginning to brown a little. You can also check with a toothpick inserted coming out clean.

Even a few days out, this is still good. I put a slice of cold butter on a untoasted piece of this, and it was heavenly.

Bloomington, NY

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5 thoughts on “Canned Pear Cake”

  1. I love this post. I can absolutely relate and I love that you referenced my favorite banana bread recipe. I’ve been making variations of it since college. In fact, my last “variation” of it was a complete failure! Sounds like a great article. Thanks for sharing!

    1. Thanks, Laura! It’s such a good recipe isn’t it? And yet still, things can go wrong. I do hope if you make this version it’s a success. ; )

      And I’m glad you liked the article. So interesting!

  2. I’m a canning hoarder too. My Mom cans big batches of tomatoes and the fruits in syrup and I do the smaller things and we swap. She just reminded me that we need to “eat up the stuff”, so I’ve been really trying not to hoard. I love cakes like this – I’m sure I’ll make it :)

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